How I Became a Liver Health Expert

Johnny with his Dad in 1995 at his 50 year class reunion
Johnny with his Dad in 1995 at his 50 year class reunion
Summary: 
As a professional I started working at Davenport Laboratories in 1984 and learned about elemental analysis from Jim Davenport. Jim was a pioneer and helped develop hair tissue mineral analysis (HTMA) in the 1970s and the director Jeffrey Bland was instrumental in overseeing the protocols, including diet and supplement recommendations. In 1985, I started working with Jim and helped further develop the analysis and eventually become the chairman of Davenport Laboratories in Addison, Texas. Soon, I reformulated all the diet and supplement protocols that the laboratory provided to the medical doctors with the HTMA.. I trained the medical doctors how to interpret the HTMA and their patients responded well to my new protocols.
Getting hepatitis a and b in high school certainly got my dad’s attention who started the local medical clinic in my home town. My dad taught me about the liver early in my life. In all respects, I owe my parents everything for taking care of me when I was sick in high school, but since they are long gone, the only way I can repay them is to help YOU. Since I am not a medical doctor I can’t prescribe, but I am a Naturopathic Doctor and I can certainly tell you my recovery story. If I tell you everything I did to recover then you can take what you need and heal too. But I also have to tell you how I learned so much and that is why I show what I learned from my dad who was a medical doctor. Everyone in my home town appreciated my Dad, but learning from him directly and indirectly and having hepatitis a, b and c was a big part of my development to becoming a liver health expert.. To understand exactly what I mean I have to give a little background.

In his twenties and early thirties my father was an engineer living in Indiana and working in Chicago and Indianapolis. When his house burned to the ground in midwinter, he lost everything, the water pipes were frozen. At 32 years of age, he told my mother, "I want to follow my dream and become a doctor." This was around 1939 and within a week and with only the clothes on their backs with my oldest sister in their arms (one year old) they left for New Orleans and my dad enrolled in Tulane Medical School.

Along with learning all about surgery in Oscher's "Bull Pin", he also specialized in Internal Medicine and Tropical Diseases. World War II was now raging on two fronts and he was in the Naval Reserves. At Tulane, my Dad taught Anatomy & Physiology and specialized in tropical disease. Particularly, he trained the medics about malaria recovery who were going to the Pacific theater of the war. Malaria is a parasite infestation of the liver and General MacArthur lost many men to the disease. He once said, “I don’t know which is worse, the fight to the death Japs with their kamikazes or dissentary and malaria.” Yes, diarrhea, hepatitis, malaria were just as much a threat to our troops on the ground in the islands of the Philippines as the enemy. This was a serious threat, so my dad taught medics the proper ways in diet and lifestyle for good liver health. In short, you could say my dad was a surgeon, general practitioner and a hepatologists. Coming out of the depression, the rations of the war and losing everything from the fire, my dad learned practical things how to make everything work with very few resources, even when it came to getting over diseases of the liver. I am certain that my dad’s training of the medics resulted in saving many lives.

Later in the early 1950’s my family moved to Northwest Florida, where my dad started his clinic. Many times when my mother went shopping she would drop me off at the clinic instead of hiring a baby sitter. My Dad would say; “go to the lab and don’t bother the patients.” The lab tech Rex Golden would show me how to use the microscope and explain the tests he was doing. He also taught me how everything worked and what disease looked like in the blood and urine samples under the microscope. He taught me the preparations of the sample and different uses of the lab equipment; like the agitator, centrifuge and X-Ray machine. For my mother, I was better off being there than hiring a babysitter. For me, it was an adventure! Eventually I learned about protocols and general use of every piece of equipment in the lab. This was a military town with the largest air force base in the world. So everyone I was around growing up; proper protocol was the order of the day, it was a way of life. By middle school I took shop where the retired air force engineer was our instructor. He taught us mechanical drawing in the beginning of class. So we had to draw it before we would use the equipment and build it. Protocol there was strict, but I learned. In high school, I learned the slide rule and typing. In order to pass the classes I had to do a proper report and all double spaced with all the calculations. Between being at the laboratory and the influence of the military all through school I developed an analytic mind set. This was during the time when I was 8 to 15 years old. Even before middle school I had my own microscope at home and dabbled with my brother’s chemistry set. During those formative years I aspired to be a scientist.

By the late 1960’s I was finishing high school, but was radical and rebellious in my lifestyle and my thinking. As far as health was concerned, that did not do me any good. In high school my little crowd of friends; 4 guys and 3 girls had already come down with hepatitis A and B. Then my mother died from liver cancer in 1973 and in 1981 I was diagnosed with with a non-A and non-B viral hepatitis. In 1991, I discovered it was life threatening hepatitis C. You could say I say I was hepatitis magnet. It was inevitable; after losing my mom to liver cancer and getting hepatitis a, b and c that the liver was always on my mind. If you can imagine, I always had to face my Dad and the conversation about the liver always came up. Even as early as the 1970’s if I ever complained about being depressed or not having enough energy my dad had the same comment: "Johnny, it’s your liver." Every time he said that it made me so angry, but I knew he was right. He always told me to stay away from liquor and as a result I never became a big drinker. The few times that I did drink, I drank too much and did stupid things like snorting cocaine, that I wish never happened. 

The study of the liver was so serious in my life and with my analytic mindset I eventually learned everything I could about it. Many times I was sincere when I asked my Dad more about liver health and chemistry. Sometimes, he would go into the details far and wide. He would tell me about foods and exercise and how it all works either for the good or for the detriment of the liver. Other times we would argue about liver health what was good and what was bad. You see this was when I was in my twenties I had a full set of S & K tools and restored classic cars and drove them around. In a silly way, I thought I was the Funz in that TV show Happy Days driving those old cars and going to talk to girls to ride with me. It takes a lot mechanical work keeping an old car going, so I was always under the hood or under the car fixing something. However, my Dad pointed out how dangerous it was for my liver being exposed to petrol fumes from alcohol, grease, cleaners, gasoline and the like. But, I thought I was Funzy and did not listen to him and soon learned all those fumes were devastating to liver health. When I would feel so tired at such a young age and looked at the results of laboratory blood tests, I saw the liver enzyme levels were way too high. Studying the lab results and learning about blood and liver chemistry became second nature to me. It seemed like I was destined since an early age to be involved with a laboratory and its procedure.

As a professional I started working at Davenport Laboratories in 1984 and learned about elemental analysis from Jim Davenport and Jeffrey Bland in North Dallas. Jim Davenport was a pioneer and helped develop hair tissue mineral analysis (HTMA) in the 1970s and the director Jeffrey Bland was instrumental in overseeing the protocols, including diet and supplement recommendations. In 1985, I started working with Jim and helped further develop the analysis and eventually become the chairman of Davenport Laboratories in Addison, Texas, Soon, I reformulated all the diet and supplement protocols that the laboratory provided to the medical doctors with the HTMA.. I trained the medical doctors how to interpret the HTMA and their patients responded well to my new protocols. Later in my career, I became a professional thought-leader in the nutritional and whole food supplement industry for over 24 years, by getting my Ph.D. and by accumulating an in-depth understanding of the liver chemistry and addiction. Part of the healing process I learned was from the nutrition and proper diet from the HTMA and the lab. All this knowledge and experience coupled with learning natural recovery from hepatitis A, B and C and cirrhosis, I emerged into a particular focus and expertise on how to develop good liver health with non chemical drug solutions and prevention. And, YES; the liver can totally regenerate itself. 

No matter what the disease if you balance the cells using the HTMA as your guide and apply the 3 Rs for Total Gut Restoration from another lab I work with then the immunity response of your body will heal all the weakest links  in your body that once held you back. Total wellness can always be within one's reach no matter what the age. The guessing game to achieve good health is over. There is only one Laboratory Naturopathic Doctor, Johnny Delirious - The Master Survivor ™ his work is truly beyond Ph.D.