Guest, Julia Assante

Guest Name: 
Julia Assante
Dr. Julia Assante, Social Historian, Professional Intuitive, Author, Writer, Professional Psychic and Medium, Doctorate in Archaeology and Art History, Professor
Guest Occupation: 
Social Historian, Professional Intuitive, Author, Writer, Professional Psychic and Medium, Doctorate in Archaeology and Art History, Professor
Guest Biography: 

Julia Assante is an established social historian of the ancient Near East (PhD Columbia University). Yet for over three decades she has also been an active professional intuitive. In her book, The Last Frontier: Exploring the Afterlife and Transforming Our Fear of Death, she applies the insights and methodologies gained from both fields in order to present a uniquely rigorous investigation of where we go after we die.

From 1977 to the present Julia has been an active professional psychic and medium. In addition to private sessions, she has taught workshops on remote viewing, healing arts and aura reading, afterdeath communication, remembering the future and reincarnational recall in the US, Canada, Germany, France and Spain, with the next one scheduled in Austria for February 2012. She has also coached physicists, medical professionals, entertainers and athletes to develop specific career-related psychic skills. She believes, however, that the real power of good psychic work is not about accurate information. It lies instead in its affect—the spontaneous revelation of a greater reality, the most important experience a person can have. Nothing brings that closer to home than afterdeath communication. Although it is a great wonder and privilege for Julia to assist the dying, officiate at funerals and contact the dead for others, what really changes people, what really heals and ends grief, what unveils the truth of immortality is making direct contact themselves.

Julia Assante received her doctorate in Archaeology and Art History of the Ancient Near East from Columbia University. On invitation, she studied the cuneiform languages of Sumerian (the first known written language) and Akkadian (the first known Semitic language) at Yale. She taught at Columbia, Bryn Mawr and the University of Münster and excavated in Crete (Minoan levels) and Israel. She has given talks at major universities and conferences in the United States and Europe and has written numerous scholarly articles. Her specific area of interest is religion, magic and sexuality, three categories that were closely interconnected in antiquity.